World top 10 beautiful special beach! Different 10 color surprise!

World top 10 beautiful special beach! Different 10 color surprise!

Though most people dream about a white sand beach, that’s not the only color beaches come in.Across the world are beaches filled with bright purple, pink, red, green, black, orange, and white sands. Whether it’s years of volcanic activity that give the sand its ashy black color or miniature coral fragments that mix with white sand to form a lovely pink hue, the results are breathtaking.

Pink Sand

Pink Sand Beach, Harbour Island, Eleuthera, Bahamas
(Picture From: worldfortravel)

(Picture From: worldfortravel)

(Picture From: 2ticketstowonderland)

(Picture From: 2ticketstowonderland)

When many people think of the Bahamas, the first thing that comes to mind is the stretch of fancy resorts and casinos that line the beaches of Nassau, Paradise Island and Cable Beach. Many of the smaller islands of the Bahamas, like Harbour Island, break that stereotype. Pink Sands Beach is the place to go for natural beauty, elegant resorts and most importantly, three miles of perfectly pink sand and gentle waters. The ocean is ideal for swimming – warm throughout the year and generally calm, protected from the rolling waves of the Atlantic by a coral reef.

Black Sand

Muriwai Black Sand Beach, New Zealand
(Picture From: Rupert Applin)

(Picture From: Rupert Applin)

(Picture From:  Ash Grant)

(Picture From: Ash Grant)

Black sand beaches are typically a result of an island’s explosive volcanic past—the rich color is a result of a mixture of iron, titanium, and several other volcanic materials. New Zealand’s stunning Muriwai Black Sand Beach is a 37-mile stretch of sparkling black sand and home to New Zealand’s largest colony of Gannet birds. Hike up the scenic trail at the southern end of the beach to two viewing platforms for great ocean views and a peek at the birds in their natural habitat, where nearly 1,200 pairs nest between August and March each year.

Purple Sand

Pfeiffer Beach, Big Sur, California
(Picture From: nationalparksblog)

(Picture From: nationalparksblog)

(Picture From: Pam)

(Picture From: Pam)

Have you ever heard of purple sand? Head to the northern coastline of Pfeiffer Beach, where patches of violet and deep-purple sand can be found. The source is large deposits of quartz and manganese garnet originating in the nearby hills being washed down from the creek to its final resting place along the Pacific. The purple sand is more likely to be seen after storms during the winter. Swimming is not recommended because of strong currents and a number of sharp purple rocks offshore, which also contribute to the beach’s rare coloration.

White Sand

Crescent Beach, Siesta Key, Florida
(Picture From: findrentals)

(Picture From: findrentals)

A lot of places boast that they have white-sand beaches, but it doesn’t get much whiter than Crescent Beach, located on Siesta Key, a barrier island just off the coast of Sarasota, FL. The sand here is 99 percent pure quartz, which has traveled down Florida’s rivers from the Appalachian Mountains. The best part about this sand’s fine texture: Not only does it feel like you’re walking through powdered sugar, but because of its unique quartz makeup, it will never heat up no matter how hot the Florida sun beats down. You’ll also find coral and other diverse rock formations at the southern end of the beach at Point of Rocks that make this a great area for diving and snorkeling. Alas, it turns out there may be one beach with whiter sand: Hyams Beach in Australia is now listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as having the whitest sand in the world.

Multi color Sand

Rainbow Beach, Australia
(Picture From: creativelunatics)

(Picture From: creativelunatics)

(Picture From: wanderlustofdill)

(Picture From: wanderlustofdill)

Rainbow Beach makes up for its small size (just 0.62 miles) with its many colors. There are 74 different hues, a clandestine combination of erosion and iron oxide buildup that has been occurring since the last ice age, and the makeup changes. There is a sad romantic story behind the colors as well. According to an ancient Aboriginal legend, the sands became colorful as a result of the rainbow spirit falling onto the large 656-foot tall beachside cliffs after losing a battle over a beautiful woman, leaving his beautiful colors to rest on the beach for all of eternity.

Glass Sand

Glass Beach, California
(Picture From: regcureguide)

(Picture From: regcureguide)

(Picture From: Mhelper)

(Picture From: Mhelper)

GLASS BEACH: We’re not talking the occasional piece of sea glass as you stroll along. These coves are covered with sea glass, some more than others. Obviously, the easily accessed coves have less glass remaining, but coves beyond are dazzling with huge amounts of sea glass that have been rounded by the rolling waves!!

Green Sand

Papakōlea Beach, Big Island of Hawaii
(Picture From: listabuzz)

(Picture From: listabuzz)

(Picture From: hawaiitopten)

(Picture From: hawaiitopten)

Located on the southern tip of Hawaii’s Big Island, Papakōlea Beach is more commonly referred to as Green Sand Beach. And for good reason. The sand here is made of tiny olivine crystals from the surrounding lava rocks that are trapped in the 49,000-year-old Pu’u Mahana cinder cone by the waters of Mahana Bay. The density of the olivine crystals keeps them from being washed away by the tide, resulting in a striking olive-green accumulation along the coastline. Swimming is allowed but waves on the windy southern coast can be particularly strong. And while it’s tempting, it’s bad form to take the sand home with you.

Orange Sand

Porto Ferro, Sardinia, Italy
(Picture From: timtim )

(Picture From: timtim )


The northern corner of Italy’s island of Sardinia is home to Porto Ferro, a one-and-a-quarter-mile stretch of oddly orange-colored sand thanks to a unique mixture of the area’s native orange limestone, crushed shells, and other volcanic deposits. You can also find 65-foot-tall ochre-colored sand dunes behind the beach on the way to Lake Baratz, Sardinia’s only natural salt lake. The area is known for its scenic bike and hiking paths, and three Spanish lookout towers—Torre Negra, Torre Bianca, and Torre de Bantine Sale—that date back to the 1600s. Boating is the best way to explore this pristine area of Sardinia, which is also a popular spot for diving, surfing, and windsurfing.

Red Sand

Red Beach, Santorini, Greece
(Picture From: cashbackauthority)

(Picture From: cashbackauthority)

(Picture From: feel-planet)

(Picture From: feel-planet)


Santorini’s Red Beach (also called Kokkini Beach) is set at the base of giant red cliffs that rise high over crystal-blue Mediterranean waters. The colorful red sand is a result of the surrounding iron-rich black and red lava rocks left over from the ancient volcanic activity of Thira, the impressive volcano that erupted and essentially shaped Santorini in 1450 B.C. Nowadays, the beach is popular with sunbathers, though you’ll want to rent beach chairs to avoid sitting directly on the coarse sand. And it’s best to visit in the early morning hours—the sand heats up under the warm Mediterranean sun.

Grey Sand

Shelter Cove, Humboldt County, California
(Picture From: lifefoc)

(Picture From: lifefoc)

(Picture From: westcoastflyingadventures)

(Picture From: westcoastflyingadventures)

One word best describes Shelter Cove: remote. It’s worth the trip to see the gray-colored sand, the result of years of erosion of the nearby gray-shale cliffs along the shore. The area is also known for its scenic coastal drives, hikes, and an abundant source of wildlife at the nearby 68,000-acre King Range National Conservation Area, home to sea lions, bald eagles, and Roosevelt elk—even Bigfoot himself has been spotted roaming the woods here.

 

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