TOP 7 Chinese Temples in Singapore

TOP 7 Chinese Temples in Singapore

Kwan Im Thong Hood Cho Temple (观音堂佛祖庙)

(Picture From: thehappyfiles)

(Picture From: thehappyfiles)

The temple has existed since 1884 at its present location with a reconstruction in 1895. The original temple was an example of Chinese temple architecture and traditional craftsmanship. This temple is a traditional Chinese Temple situated at 178 Waterloo Street in Singapore. The temple is significance to the Chinese in Singapore and believed to bring worshippers good luck after praying to the Kuan Yin. Each day a large numbers of worshippers come to pay respect and ask for her blessing. This major temple features Chinese-style roofs, granite tiles and the use of red, golden and yellow throughout the building.
Address: 178 Waterloo Street, Singapore 187964

Siong Lim Temple (莲山双林寺)

(Picture From: Bridget Smart )

(Picture From: Bridget Smart )

Lian Shan Shuang Lin Monastery (莲山双林寺, which means “Twin Grove of the Lotus Mountain Temple”), or Shuang Lin Monastery for short, is a Buddhist monastery located in Toa Payoh. The name of the monastery refers to the Twin Groves of sala trees located at the Bodhgaya in India, where Buddha was believed to have attained enlightenment. This large temple was built in 1908 and is now classified a National Monument. The temple, which commemorates Buddha’s birth and death, has a highly decorated gateway, accessible only by bridge, which opens into a courtyard. The huge incense burners is inside the temple and a beautifully carved Buddha imported from Thailand. The temple also equip with a monastery, a smaller temple and a rock garden.
Address: 184E Jalan Toa Payoh, Singapore 319941

Thian Hock Keng Temple (天福宫)

(Picture From: karana)

(Picture From: karana)

Thian Hock Keng Temple (Temple of Heavenly Happiness) is one of the oldest and most important Hokkien temple in Singapore, located in Chinatown. The construction of Thian Hock Keng was completed in 1842, more than 100 years ago, when it was a beachfront temple. The local was the first stop for grateful Chinese immigrants who have survived the difficult voyage from Southern China. At the entrance to the Temple is a very low granite wall or barrier built to prevent the seawater entering the Temple during high tide. This Taoist-Buddhist temple was dedicated to Ma Zu Po, the Mother of Heavenly Sages and the protector of sailors. The temple was built in traditional southern Chinese architectural style. The entire structure was assembled without nails. It is an architectural masterpiece of stone, tiles and wood, dragons and phoenixes, amazing carvings, intricate sculptures and imposing columns. Beyond this elaborate entrance are two courtyards that lead to the temple proper, which comprises the shrine of Ma Cho Po. On either side of the temple there are pagodas.

Address: 158 Telok Ayer Street, Singapore 068613

Bright Hill Temple

(Picture From: jimmysantiago)

(Picture From: jimmysantiago)

The actual name of Bright Hill Temple is the Kong Meng San Phor Kark See Monastery. Built in 1920, Kong Meng San Phor Kark See Monastery is a place which provides lodging for monks and also practice as a Mahayana Buddhist temple. Covering 12 hectares, this is the largest temple in Singapore. A modern construction, this impressive edifice features many fine Chinese statues, shrines and decorations. With beautiful Chinese style architecture, this monastery is a calm and quiet place which provides a great location for anyone who wants to meditate or relax. There is also a large turtle pool and a serene garden and the temple grounds also house a crematorium.
Address: 88 Bright Hill Road, Singapore 574117

Leong San See Temple

(Picture From: pianofortephilia)

(Picture From: pianofortephilia)

Leong San See Temple in Singapore is one of beautiful and unique religious sites or temple which in one block have Taoist temple, Buddhist temple and Hindu temple. Leong San See Temple Singapore located on 371 Race Course Road, Little India, Rochor – Singapore.Rather on the small side, this temple used to serve as a hub for the new coming Chinese migrants. National Monument of a great importance. This Taoist temple is located right across from the Thai Buddhist Temple and was built to honour Guanyin (sometimes referred to as Guanyin), the Chinese Goddess of Mercy. Guan Yin is popular among childless couples who come to pray for its blessings. Its main structure resembles a Chinese palace. Red and yellow are the two main colors used in this temple.

Address: 371 Race Course Road, Singapore 218641

Temple of 1000 Lights (Sakyamuni Buddha Gaya Temple)

 

The Thai Buddhist Sakyamuni Buddha Gaya Temple was established by the Thai monk Vuthisara in 1927. The hall of the temple holds the 300 tonnes Buddha statue that was surrounded b

(Picture From: Lek)

(Picture From: Lek)

y hundreds of lights, which is why the temple was named after it (The Temple of 1,000 Lights). The architecture is mainly in Thai style with a large 15-metre-high Buddha statue seated inside the temple as well as many smaller images. After gaining huge popularity and funded by philanthropist Aw Boon How and Aw Boon Par in 1930, the building was transformed into the grand present stage. The philanthropist brothers, Aw Boon How and Aw Boon Par is the founders of the Tiger Balm Enterprise. “How” in Chinese dialects represent tiger and “Par” represents leopard. These two animal sculptures and motifs symbolize the spirit of the temple.
Address: 366 Race Course Road, Singapore 218636

Buddha Tooth Relic Temple

(Picture From: Rasit.S)

(Picture From: Rasit.S)

This is another interesting temple in Singapore. If you go to China Town, you’ll find this wonderful attraction which is based on Tang dynasty architectural style. Opened in 2007, now this temple has become one of the most popular attractions in China Town, Singapore. The Buddha Tooth Relic Temple is a remarkable four-story temple. When entering the gate, you’ll immediately notice the stunning main hall with its high ceiling. The bell tower and drum tower are on the same floor. The Buddhist Culture Museum on the third floor houses about 300 Buddhist artifacts from all around Asia including China, Thailand, Myanmar and Pakistan. They offer a free English-language tour every Tuesday and Thursday and to avoid disappointment, it is wise to book early by calling in advance. The little teahouse located on the second floor is a nice place to relax after the tour which usually lasts about an hour and here you’ll be served not only tea but some vegetarian cuisine.
The temple holds ceremonies on a daily basis; visitors are allowed to take photos, even during services. Avoid off-the-shoulder T-shirts, shorts and mini-skirts as dress with respectful attire is required when visiting the temple.

Address: 288 South Bridge Road, Singapore 058840

 

 

Via singapore-guide.com

 

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