10 Most Famous Attraction in Hong Kong

10 Most Famous Attraction in Hong Kong

Hong Kong’s Top 10 attractions are popular for good reason.

The Peak

(Picture From: lovelyhongkong)

(Picture From: lovelyhongkong)

If there is only one thing you can do in Hong Kong, go to The Peak. If you have many things to do here, still go to The Peak. The highest point on Hong Kong Island, this has been the city’s most exclusive neighborhood since colonial times – back then it was the cooler air that attracted the rich and famous; in the post air-conditioning era, the views of one of the world’s most spectacular cityscapes keep them coming.

Hong Kong Disneyland

(Picture From: David Jr)

(Picture From: David Jr)

Non-stop Fun from Day to Night – Disney in a Whole New Light
There are a lot more magical memories awaiting families in Hong Kong Disneyland, where you will embark on a magical journey through seven themed lands from day to night!

Each day, as the sunlight fades, millions of tiny lights will transform the entire park and present the best of Hong Kong Disneyland in a whole new light. Shining brightest of all is the all new Disney Paint the Night nighttime spectacular – a symphony of music and colour that will truly make your imagination soar. Stunning constellations of light showcasing some of your favourite Disney stories will touch your heart and make you gaze in wonder. You can even play a part in the show! With a wave of your magic paintbrush, you can watch many of the performer’s costumes change colour – in real time!

Ocean Park Hong Kong

(Picture From: Venkat)

(Picture From: Venkat)

Opened in 1977, Ocean Park Hong Kong is a marine-life theme park featuring animal exhibits, thrill rides and shows. In 2012, its impressive ability to offer guests a world-class experience that blends entertainment with education and conservation was confirmed when it became the first Asian winner of the biannual Applause Award, the most prestigious award in the amusement and theme park industry.

Ladies’ Market

(Picture From: Jamie)

(Picture From: Jamie)

With over 100 stalls of bargain clothing, accessories and souvenirs, the Ladies’ Market on Tung Choi Street provides a one-kilometer stretch on which to practice your haggling skills. It gets its name from the huge amount of clothing and accessories on sale for women of all ages; however, with watches, cosmetics, bags, home furnishings, CDs and trinkets also up for grabs, you don’t need to be just in the market for a pair of nylon stockings to find something within its crowded aisles.

Temple Street Night Market

(Picture From: Pobox 9)

(Picture From: Pobox 9)

When the sun goes down, the traders have already laid out their wares and the opera singers and fortune tellers begin to emerge. Welcome to the Temple Street Night Market, a popular street bazaar, named after a Tin Hau temple located in the center of its main drag, and a place so steeped in local atmosphere that it has served as the backdrop to many a memorable movie.

Trinkets, tea ware, electronics, watches, menswear, jade and antiques are scrutinized and haggled over, while clay pot rice, seafood, noodles and other treats are consumed with gusto.

Temple Street Night Market is an enduring example of the theater and festivity of a Chinese market. And it’s on show nightly.

Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Center (and Golden Bauhinia Square)

(Picture From: jewellerymag)

(Picture From: jewellerymag)

With its vast curtain of glass and 40,000 square-metre aluminium roof sculpted to echo a seabird soaring in flight, the striking Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre is a major landmark on the Hong Kong Island skyline. Known worldwide as HKCEC, this harbour-front expansion used top-down construction techniques to meet a challenge of limited land supply; its highly innovative methods winning many industry accolades.

While Jackie Chan fans may remember the building as the setting for the dramatic grand finale of New Police Story, it was also the backdrop for a drama of far more significance – the Handover Ceremony on 30 June 1997. This is when the former British Crown Colony was returned to the People’s Republic of China and the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region was established.

Internationally, the HKCEC is known as a world-class convention and exhibition centre and was voted Best Convention and Exhibition Centre in Asia for the ninth time by industry awards in 2012.

Clock Tower

(Picture From: lolviet)

(Picture From: lolviet)

Standing 44-metres tall, the old Clock Tower was erected in 1915 as part of the Kowloon–Canton Railway terminus. The once-bustling station is long gone, but this red brick and granite tower, now preserved as a Declared Monument, survives as an elegant reminder of the Age of Steam. It has also been a memorable landmark for the millions of Chinese immigrants who passed through the terminus to begin new lives not just in Hong Kong, but in other parts of the world via the city’s harbor.

Tsim Sha Tsui Promenade

(Picture From : Wikimedia)

(Picture From : Wikimedia)

Starting at the colonial-era Clock Tower and stretching all the way to Hung Hom, a stroll along the Tsim Sha Tsui Promenade takes one past the Hong Kong Cultural Center and the Hong Kong Space Museum. But like most of the love birds and shutterbugs on the promenade, your gaze will be drawn south to the dramatic topographical and architectural spectacle that is the Hong Kong Island skyline towering over the busy waters of Victoria Harbour.

Lan Kwai Fong

(Picture From: Madbuzzhk)

(Picture From: Madbuzzhk)

Lan Kwai Fong is one of Hong Kong’s most popular nightlife hot spots and home to over 90 restaurants and bars. The atmosphere ranges from stylish wine pairings to raucous jelly shots and the food on offer is as diverse as the clientele.

Lan Kwai Fong usually hosts carnivals and other celebrations during major festivals, such as Halloween, Christmas and New Year and has its own beer festival.

Sik Sik Yuen Wong Tai Sin Temple

(Picture From: Wikipedia)

(Picture From: Wikipedia)

The Wong Tai Sin Temple’s claim to ‘make every wish come true upon request’ might have something to do with its popularity. Home to three religions (Taoism, Buddhism and Confucianism) its natural setting and beautifully ornamented buildings make it as much a scenic attraction as an important religious center.

The temple commemorates the famous monk of yore, Wong Tai Sin (also known as Huang Chu-ping), who was born in the 4th century and became a deity at Heng Shan (Red Pine Hill). In 1915, Taoist priest Liang Ren-an carried a sacred portrait of Wong Tai Sin from Guangdong in southern China to Hong Kong. Now housing this precious portrait, the Wong Tai Sin Temple is where worshipers pray for good fortune through offerings, divine guidance and fortune telling.

 

Via discoverhongkong.com

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  • sonia
    September 5, 2017, 6:11 pm

    nice post
    thanks for sharing this one.

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